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Fluid Mechanics (10.303 & 14.301)
Course Description and Requirements

Course Description
TThis course introduces the student to several fundamental concepts and applications of fluid mechanics. It overviews the basic properties of fluids, the study of fluid statics and fluid flow systems, and the development and application of the appropriate mass, momentum, and energy balance relationships needed to solve a variety of practical problems, with a particular focus on the macroscopic view. Emphasis is on the ability to apply the basic principles to the design and analysis of engineering systems involving applications in hydrostatics, internal flows, pump selection, flow measurement, etc.. Some discussion of open channel and external flows is also treated as time permits. The course also focuses on proper problem-solving strategy and on the correct use of units in engineering analysis.

Textbook
Y. A. Cengel and J. M. Cimbala, Fluid Mechanics - Fundamentals and Applications, McGraw Hill (2006).

Prerequisites
Mathematics through Calculus III and Differential Equations.
Computational analysis capabilities with Excel, Matlab, or an equivalent package.

Course Website
http://profjrwhite.com/courses.htm

Course Requirements
The requirements for this course include two exams during the semester, a comprehensive final exam, several short quizzes, and a variety of homework assignments and projects. The homework/projects will be collected, and selected problems will be graded for technical content, organization, and for overall professional appearance. The graded homework and projects will be worth 40% of the final grade. This is significant since it is expected that a large part of the learning of fluid mechanics will be associated with the student’s effort on the homework assignments. Late homework will be accepted and recorded as being complete, but severe late penalties will be applied. A maximum grade of 50% will be given for any late work since some solutions are discussed in class and all solutions are posted shortly after the assignments are collected.

Short quizzes may also be given during class lectures to address key concepts from previous classes and from the assigned reading. These quizzes will be evaluated and the quiz grades will be integrated into your homework grade for the course.
Also, with only two exams required during the semester and a final exam during Finals Week, it is expected that everyone will be present for the scheduled examinations -- thus, no makeup exams will be given (except for extreme emergency situations)!!! Since the quizzes are unannounced, this no-makeup policy also applies to the quizzes -- so you should plan to attend classes on a regular basis.

Since a lot of support material is needed for solving most fluid mechanics problems (i.e. from several data tables and figures throughout your text), and because I am not a big fan of making students memorize a bunch of facts and equations, both the semester exams and the final exam will be open-book tests! Thus, you should become well acquainted with your text as the semester progresses.

One or more projects may also be given during the semester. Evaluation of these projects will be integrated into your overall HW Grade. The projects typically require a combination of analytical and computer analyses (and possibly some lab work) and a professional summary report of your work. The project reports should discuss the analyses performed for the projects and identify the key results and conclusions that were obtained. Small teams of 2 or 3 students are encouraged to work together for the projects.

Grading Policy
The final grade for this course will be determined as follows:

Homework/Projects/Quizzes
40%
Two Semester Exams
30%
Final Exam (3 hrs)
30%

Course Coordinator
Dr. John R. White
Office: EB302
Phone: 978-934-3165
Fax: 978-934-3047
Email: John_White@uml.edu

Note: My office hours for this semester will be posted outside my office and on my website at profjrwhite.com during the first week of the semester -- as soon as my schedule becomes finalized.

Last updated by Prof. John R. White (Sept. 2006)

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